Repercussions of Gendercide: The Local and Global Impact of a Culturally Influenced Practice

By Ji Yeon Park, Natali Nunez, Ambica Teja, Wei Deng and Julia Borovay.

Published by The Global Studies Journal

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Gendercide, defined as the aggregate of the incidences of female feticide and female infanticide, has repercussions on the health of developing nations such as China and India. The practice of gendercide prevails because of deep-seated, cultural patriarchal values that minimize the worth of women, and is manifested in China and India’s male-to-female sex ratios of 119:100 and 122:100, respectively. Although these gender ratios directly impact the countries that practice gendercide, the effects transcend borders. The negative consequences of this practice are associated with female health and include complications arising from abortion. Not only does this practice terminate the lives of millions of females, but it will also leave a large proportion of men in both China and India unmarried in the near future. The surplus of single men will contribute to an increase in violence-related deaths and injuries, as well as sex trafficking activity. In addition, gendercide will impact health locally and globally, through escalated rates of morbidity and mortality from disease, in particular HIV/AIDS. The origins and consequences of gendercide underscore the influence of local cultural practices on global health.

Keywords: Gendercide, Sex Ratio, Global Health

Global Studies Journal, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp.57-70. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 608.817KB).

Ji Yeon Park

Global Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

Natali Nunez

Global Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

Ambica Teja

Global Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

Wei Deng

Global Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

Dr. Julia Borovay

Lecturer, Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

Julia G. Borovay, Dr.P.H., is a lecturer in the USC Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research [HP]. She teaches three HP courses: Cultural Competency; Culture, Lifestyle, and Health; and Eastern Medicine and Modern Health. Her research interests are in the areas of cultural competence in health care; health belief models, and patient compliance with recommended medical treatment plans. She was formerly project director for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services pediatric HIV/AIDS surveillance project and for the perinatal hepatitis B prevention program. She recently participated for five years as research ethnographer for a CDC-sponsored intervention study of parental efficacy in a recruited population of low-income mothers through the UCLA Department of Pediatrics and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International. Dr. Borovay received her M.A. in anthropology at CSU, Chico, and a graduate degree in linguistics from the University of California, Davis. She earned her doctorate in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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