The Ethnicity of Breast Cancer: Cultural Discrepancies in Diagnosis and Treatment Decision

By Nasim Amjadi-Begvand, Maral Gazarian, Julianna Howland, Jessica Louise Trimis and Felix Yong.

Published by The Global Studies Journal

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among American women, yet, despite its substantial impact, disparities exist among women of differing ethnic backgrounds in diagnosis and treatment decisions; culture plays a critical role in the breast cancer experience of women of Latina, Caucasian, and African-American descent. Discrepancies in diagnosis may be the result of cultural factors in access to healthcare, quality of healthcare, or adequacy and availability of information on breast cancer. Disparities in physician-patient relationships and the role of family in making medical decisions affect a patient’s choice for treatment, and are prominent reasons for the variance in treatment decisions observed across ethnic groups and the corresponding differences in mortality rates. Several studies examining ethnic differences and factors in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment were reviewed. The results of this research indicate a need to account for cultural factors in the breast healthcare of women; such factors significantly affect the experiences of women of differing ethnic groups with breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Keywords: Breast Cancer, Cultural Disparities, Treatment Decision, Cancer Diagnosis, Women’s Health

Global Studies Journal, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp.77-84. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 603.439KB).

Nasim Amjadi-Begvand

Student, Department of Global Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Maral Gazarian

Student, Department of Global Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Julianna Howland

Student, Department of Global Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Jessica Louise Trimis

Student, Department of Global Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Felix Yong

Student, Department of Global Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA


Reviews:

There are currently no reviews of this product.

Write a Review